Radiographs of your teeth, or commonly known as x-rays, are essential, preventative, diagnostic tools that dentists use to provide valuable information not visible to the naked eye during your routine exam. Our Raleigh dentist and dental hygienists use your x-rays to safely and accurately detect dental abnormalities that may be hidden and complete an accurate treatment plan for them. Without the help of  x-rays, oral problem areas may go undetected.

Dental x-rays in Raleigh may reveal:

  • Abscesses or cysts in the mouth.
  • Bone loss.
  • Tumors (cancerous and non-cancerous).
  • Decay of or between the teeth.
  • Abnormalities in the mouth development
  • Abnormal positioning of the teeth and roots.
  • Problems inside the teeth or below the gums.
  • Detecting dental problems at an early stage, treating and preventing those problems so you can save you time, money, unnecessary discomfort, and your teeth!

Are Raleigh dental x-rays safe?

Everyone faces exposure to natural radiation in our environment daily. The radiation exposure during your dental x-rays is no more than the amount of radiation people face in their natural environment.

Dental x-rays are considered safe because they only produce a low level of radiation. Our Raleigh dentist takes the necessary precautions to limit the exposure to radiation that a patient has during dental x-rays. We use lead apron shields to protect the patient’s body and use modern, fast film that cuts the time it takes to capture an x-ray, also limiting the exposure of radiation.

How often should dental x-rays be taken?

Every patient differs on their need for dental x-rays. Depending on the individual dental needs, dental history, symptoms, and risk for disease for the patient, Dr. Schmorr will determine how frequently x-rays are needed.

We recommend each new patient getting a full mouth series of dental x-rays, which is usually good for three to five years. Other x-rays, like bite wing x-rays are usually taken at your recall visits, and are recommended to be done once or twice a year, depending on the condition of your dental health.